10 Crazy Random Facts About Sharks

Scuba divers have a unique perspective on life below the waves. While many of us think of sharks as ferocious predators that might attack at any time, divers have a unique point of view.

We find these ancient, diverse and beautiful creatures fascinating and it sounds like there’s always something new to find out about sharks. There are many hundred species of sharks, ranging in size from less than 10 inches to over 50 feet. These amazing animals have a fierce reputation, but fascinating biology. Here are 10 crazy facts about sharks..

Facts About Sharks

Facts About Sharks

10 Crazy Random Facts About Sharks :-

  1. Stomachs of Steel

    Facts About Sharks

    Facts About Sharks

    Shoes, chairs, boxes of nails, drums, entire bottles of wine and the rear half of a horse are some of the many bizarre objects that are found in sharks’ stomachs over the years.

  2. There are over 400 species of sharks.

    Facts About Sharks

    Facts About Sharks

    Sharks come in a good variety of shapes, sizes and even colors. The largest shark and the largest fish in the world is the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), which is believed to reach a maximum length of 59 feet. The littlest shark is believed to be the dwarf lanternshark (Etmopterus perryi) that is about 6-8 inches long.

  3. Sharks have rows of teeth.

    Facts About Sharks

    Facts About Sharks

    The teeth of sharks don’t have roots, so they sometimes fall out after a few week. However, sharks have replacements arranged in rows and a new one can move in within one day to require the old one’s place. Sharks have 5 to fifteen rows of teeth in every jaw, with most having 5 rows. The average shark has 40-45 teeth and can have up to seven rows of replacement teeth. because sharks lose lots of teeth and grow them back quickly. They typically undergo over 30,000 teeth in a lifetime.

  4. Sharks don’t have scales.

    Facts About Sharks

    Facts About Sharks

    A shark has tough skin that’s covered by dermal denticles, that are small plates covered with enamel, just like that found on our teeth. Most sharks must swim constantly to force water through their mouths and over their gills as a result of they lack the ability to pump water over their gills just like the majority of fish.

  5. Sharks have a lateral line system, that detects movements within the water.

    Facts About Sharks

    Facts About Sharks

    Sharks have a lateral line system on their sides, that detects water movements. This helps the shark find prey and navigate around other objects at night or when water visibility is poor. The lateral line system is formed of a network of fluid-filled canals beneath the shark’s skin. Pressure waves in the ocean water around the shark vibrate this liquid. This in turn is transmitted to jelly in the system, that transmits to the shark’s nerve endings and the message is relayed to the brain.

  6. Sharks sleep differently than we do.

    Facts About Sharks

    Facts About Sharks

    Sharks need to keep water moving over their gills to receive necessary oxygen. Not all sharks got to move constantly, though. Some sharks have spiracles, a small opening behind their eyes, that force water across the shark’s gills that the shark is still when it rests. Other sharks do need to swim constantly to stay water moving over their gills and their bodies and have active and restful periods instead of undergoing deep sleep like we do. They appear to be “sleep swimming,” having parts of their brain less active whereas they remain swimming.

  7. A Shark can Die if it Stops Moving

    Facts About Sharks

    Facts About Sharks

    Well, it’s sort of true. but also false. There are over 400 species of sharks. Some need to move pretty much all the time to stay water moving over their gills so they will breathe. Some sharks have structures called spiracles which permit them to breathe while they’re lying on the ocean bottom. A spiracle could be a small gap each eye. This structure forces water across the shark’s gills so the shark is still when it rests. This structure is handy for bottom-dwelling shark relatives like rays and skates and sharks like wobbegong sharks. Hence who ambush their prey by launching themselves off the ocean bottom when a fish passes by.

  8. Humans are a threat to sharks.

    Facts About Sharks

    Facts About Sharks

    Humans are a bigger threat to sharks than sharks are to us. Many shark species are threatened by fishing or by-catch, amounting to the death of millions of sharks every year. Compare that to shark attack statistics – whereas a shark attack is a ugly issue. There are about ten fatalities worldwide each year due to sharks. Since they’re long-lived species and only have a few young at once, sharks are vulnerable to over-fishing. One threat is the wasteful practice of shark-fining, a cruel follow within which the shark’s fins are cut off whereas the rest of the shark is thrown back in the ocean.

  9. Sharks are long-lived species.

    Facts About Sharks

    Facts About Sharks

    While no one seems to know truth answer. It’s estimated that the whale shark, the biggest shark species, can live up to 100-150 years. Since plenty of of the smaller sharks can live a minimum of 20-30 years.

  10.  Sharks are cartilaginous fish.

    Facts About Sharks

    Facts About Sharks

    The term “cartilaginous fish” means the structure of the animal’s body is formed of cartilage, instead of bone. Unlike the fins of bony fishes, the fins of cartilaginous fishes cannot change form or fold alongside their body. Even though sharks don’t have a bony skeleton like several other fish. They’re still categorized with other vertebrates within the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, and class Elasmobranchii. This class is formed up of about 1,000 species of sharks, skates and rays.

Sharks have a fierce reputation. There are actually about 400 species of sharks, and not all (not even most) attack humans. Movies like Jaws, shark attacks within the news and sensational TV shows have led several to believe that sharks need to be feared, and even killed. However in reality, sharks have much more to worry from us than we do of them.

Now for the real question: Why protect sharks? Will it matter if millions are sharks are killed every year?

Facts About Sharks

Facts About Sharks

Sharks are important for a variety of reasons. One is that some species are apex predators – this implies that they need no natural predators and are at the top of the food chain. These species keep other species in check and their removal may have drastic impacts on an ecosystem. Removal of an apex predator may end up in an increase in smaller predators, that causes an overall decline in prey populations. It was once thought that culling shark populations may result in a rise in commercially valuable fish species, but this is likely not the case.

Sharks can keep fish stocks healthy. They’ll feed on weak, unhealthy fish, that lessens the chance that disease can unfold through fish populations.

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